Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Ty Lorenzo — undo

1. Anti pop up and comer Ty Lorenzo has continued to evolve with new single “undo.” The song keeps the rock-inspired, emotionally intense energy of songs like “potentially fatal,” while adding a fierce electronic nature to the instrumental, bridging and accentuating past sounds. Despite its initial intensity, the song has a sort of relaxed, carribean vibe that certainly makes it a single worth kicking back to and enjoying. The variability of the production is certainly another major development for Lorenzo, taking some of the burden off of the (unmistakably infectious) vocals and hooks. …


Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Aries — Fool’s Gold

1. Anti pop legend Aries made his much-awaited return with the advent of new single “FOOL’S GOLD.” As can be expected, the return does not come close to disappointing, with various infectious melodies and complex, electronic-tinged instrumentation demonstrating his ability to perfectly balance vocals and production. The lyrics are quite important, reflective of Aries’ journey in the music industry, but there are such catchy and exciting lines like “if I made milli than my mommy made a milli” that will have the listener singing along in no time. …


Image for post
Image for post

Though centered around FL Studio produced beats, Yung Scuff’s influences come unmistakably from rock bands of the mid to late 2000s golden years. On his EP “YUNGSCUFFONLINE,” however, the scene tinged artist opts for an ode to the pop of the era, working with accomplished underground producer Curtains.

The first track, LY2, featuring friends Lil Narnia and Shyburial, immediately starts with the saccharine, bubblegum-bass inspired beats known increasingly as “hyperpop.” Scuff’s pitched up voice also seems indicative of entry to this genre, but as the backing screams come in, it’s clear the song is more crunkcore than glitchcore. With near…


Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Monto and Bryce Bishop — Falling

1. Anti-popstars Bryce Bishop and Monto have come together on “Falling,” an insanely infectious collaboration surrounding being used by a past significant other. The songwriting skills of both artists have proven to be particularly apt, with hit after hit but something truly special has come out of the collaboration, with each independent piece of the greater picture standing out in its own way. Bryce’s deep voice and 2010s emo-indie inspired singing style contrasts nicely with Monto’s more traditionally alt-r&b voice, adding layers to the already strong composition. …


Image for post
Image for post

From ear-busting metalcore to the lofi sounds of dreamy shoegaze, Demxntia brings an r&b twist to a variety of alternative music genres that have inspired him on his first technical full length, bittersweet and proves yet again that he can do it all. Collaborating with artists similarly influenced by such genres on a select number of tracks, Demxntia goes all in on paying homage to his influences, whether that be an anime like Fooly Cooly or pop punk superstars Neck Deep. It’s an album pervaded by meaningful thought, and an unsurprisingly powerful stepping stone in the Florida artist’s career.

Under…


Image for post
Image for post

From excited guitar riffs to zany dance interludes, “HD” by Abbot defies genre, a piece crafted by someone who clearly loves music. While it certainly finds roots in the whole “anti pop” proliferation, the songs range from rock anthems to electronically-inclined ragers, pushing the limits of which pieces can come together to make one song, and broadly, an album. It synthesizes pieces from each point of nostalgia, creating something oddly familiar, yet groundbreaking at the same time. Each moment is meaningful and carefully selected, allowing both the sound and message to flow through uninterrupted by filler or unfit sounds, a…


Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Knapsack — Sleepyhead

1. Electronic artist Knapsack, a recent performer at Open Pit production Lavapalooza and genre synthesizer has released yet another album single titled “sleepyhead.” Dialing back the indietronica of many of his past efforts, Knapsack opt for an airy, infectious r&b accompanied by his classic electronic production style. The combination of the singing style and vocal editing cause the thin-sounding vocals to cut like glass, a nice touch that helps Knapsack stand out even further. The emotive vocal delivery of the verses accompanied by the bubbling instrumental make for yet another duality that makes the song applicable to a number of…


Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Shrimp — Fear of Failure / Scared of Success

1. Vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Shrimp recently released the new single “fear of failure / scared of success.” The song follows the path of cult hit “this body means nothing to me,” departing from the coldwave-inspired “emo trap” embracing his roots in gritty, post-punk inspired indie rock. From the first second, the listener is hit with a barrage of distorted guitars, later bringing in distant, distorted vocals with an intentionally low fidelity approach to their mix. This style continues, properly channeling the guitar tone and vocals of both indie rock and post-punk, combining them into a sound that would not sound…


Image for post
Image for post
Cover: Glaive — Aresnic

1. Glaive is a name known throughout the supposed monolithic underground. The 15 year old vocalist and producer has made waves as of late with extremely catchy hits suchs as “astrid” and “clover.” This week, he yet again knocked it out of the park with his new single “arsenic.” Often unfairly lumped into the vaguely defined hyperpop genre, glaive synthesizes sounds from pop, hip hop, electronica and emo-tinged rock genres to create something that is altogether his own and needs no genre categorization. The beat is initially composed of minimal guitar with soft, emotive vocals that bring home the confessional…


Image for post
Image for post

Crafted in quarantine over nothing but internet-enabled communication, Japanese Breakfast mastermind Michelle Zauner and Crying member Ryan Galloway came together to bring the sounds of past and present together on vibrant summer closer, “pop songs 2020.”

The aesthetics of the promotional art tie almost seamlessly into the sound of the songs, with percussion reminiscent of the lofi beat phenomenon, vivacious synths reminiscent of the mid-2010s future funk movement and of course, a nice smattering of 80s Japanese city pop. At the same time, though, the EP defies genre.

There are certainly moments of early Crying’s tweet sound and the dreamy…

Dylan Joaquin

Music Journalist. Owner, writer and editor of Under the Rug. Lover of underground gems.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store